Specs from the Plugfest

Members of the Project Sun’s Tango team have reported on the recent Interop plugfest at Microsoft’s Redmond campus. This is the fourth plugfest that they have taken part in.

The first three were focused on interoperability between Java and .NET 3.0. WSIT 1.0 passes all the scenarios for all all technologies when interoperating with .NET 3.0, writes Harold Carr on Harold Carr’s Blog.

Microsoft has shipped Vista, which includes .NET 3.0. Sun will FCS WSIT 1.0 in September as part of GlassFish v2. Meanwhile, specifications that describe the interop between WSIT and .NET 3.0 are listed on Carr’s Blog. [See URL below]

http://weblogs.java.net/blog/haroldcarr/archive/2007/07/project_tango_a_1.html

SOAP and High Performance: An Oxymoron?

XML messaging using the SOAP protocol has become the lingua franca for interoperability. But it is not suited for high-performance messaging, writes GemStone Chief Architect Jags Ramnarayan on his blog. Like others, Ramnarayan sees benefits in the emergence of a language-neutral data architecture that allows applications to be built in the language that best fits their needs. Read more »

From ORBs to Web services

TheServerSide Interop Blog has covered Web services extensively. But not to the inclusion of other methods of achieving interoperability. One premise we have pursued – one that is not a natural fit with the Silver Bullet mentality of most software marketing, is that Web services is not the be-all and end-all – not the answer to every question. Okay, so that’s out of the way.  The matter came up as part of our recent discussion with Alex Krapf of Codemesh, maker of Juggernaut.

We asked Alex about Web services. He said: “I think of Web services as the CORBA of our day.” We asked why he said that. Read more »

WS Death Star sited at TSS Java Symposium at Barcelona

Sometime TSS Interop Blog guest blogger Adrian Trenaman  has reported on the doings at TSS Java Symposium Europe at Barcelona. There, he and Ted Neward discussed Pragmatic XML web services with CXF and .Net. And he discusses much more. His take on keynoter Martin Fowler’s take on WS-* is noteworthy. Don’t’ throw the baby out with the bathwater is the bottom line. Read more »

Project Tango: The Big Picture

Arun Gupta has been describing the ins and outs of Project Glassfish and Project Tango for some time, and he has recently pulled together the key aspects of this emerging interop platform in a thorough document that provides an overview of Tango.

Project Tango is an open source implementation from Sun Microsystems of WS-* Web services specifications. Moreover, Tango benefits from considerable effort put into Tango by Sun and Microsoft to ensure it provides interoperability with .NET 3.0. Read more »

Web Services Policy 1.5 - Framework

WS-Policy defines a language for web service requirements and capabilities that can be used together with other description languages, such as WSDL. The Web Services Policy 1.5 - Framework is at Proposed Recommendation stage.

Is there a DL after WSDL?
http://www.w3.org/TR/2007/PR-ws-policy-20070706/

Project Metro: the new name for the Web services stack from Sun

Arun Gupta has pointed out a new name for the JAX-WS + Project Tango combination: Project Metro. JAX-WS is the standardized web services stack, and Project Tango is the interoperability toolkit. What is Metro?

Read more »

Neward and Trenaman consider REST, or The Great and Complete SOAP vs POX Debate

How far can you go with GET, PUT, POST, DELETE? Much of the programming world asks the question. Here in one place are the complete collected episodes from Ted Neward’s and Adrian Trenaman’s recent conversation on the matter of SOAP and POX.

The interpid Neward suggests objects and XML have just as deep an impedance mismatch as objects and relational data do. REST is a good architectural style, admits Adrian, but he notes that SOAP, since it’s transport-agnostic, would work even if you wanted to send the message over other transports beyond HTTP, like JMS messages. Check it out! Read more »

SOAP vs POX Debate, Part Four

(Editor’s note: This is the fourth part of a continued series of transcriptions from a conversation secretly recorded at an “after” party in San Francisco thrown by a company who shall remain nameless but rhymes with “oogle” during the JavaOne 2007 conference between Ted Neward and Adrian Trenaman, who were discussing the SOAP-vs-REST debate. Ted had just suggested the idea that SOAP was inherently RESTful, and Adrian needed a break to drink more while he revelled in the implications…) Read more »

SOAP vs POX Debate, Part Three

(Editor’s note: This is the third part of a continued series of transcriptions from a conversation secretly recorded at an “after” party in San Francisco thrown by a company who shall remain nameless but rhymes with “oogle” during the JavaOne 2007 conference between Ted Neward and Adrian Trenaman, who were discussing the SOAP-vs-REST debate.) Read more »